4 pitfalls to avoid with architectural salvage

Architectural salvage is a striking, eco-friendly choice for your project. Ensure a smooth-sailing project using these materials with this handy guide.

By Hugh Metcalf | 6 January 2020

If you want to include genuine period details and materials recovered from old buildings in your design, follow these helpful tips to avoid potential problems.

Mark Lewis interior design for Hoxton Square - granddesignsmagazine.com

Image: Mark Lewis Interior Design, kitchen cabinets made from salvaged pine boards, from £75 per sq. m

Reclaimed, salvaged materials are not only a strong aesthetic choice, but also a chance to re-use something that may otherwise end of in landfill.

However, the use of reclaimed materials can have its challenges in a build or renovation project. We’ve outlined a handful of potential pitfalls when using architectural salvage, and how you can avoid making these mistakes.

Factor into your build time

When you’re working to a strict timeline, it’s key to anticipate that sourcing reclaimed materials doesn’t work to the same schedule as ordering of the shelf products. Letting your architect/construction team know that you want to use a salvaged material from the outset is a good idea, so that they can keep this in mind for future deadlines – they may also be able to help you source them.