Create your own hi-tech kitchen

Bring your kitchen into the twenty-first century with the latest technology.

By Rachel Ogden | 13 January 2017

The latest technology brings the twenty-first century into the heart of your home.

Create your own hi tech kitchen1

LWK Kitchens London (020 7536 9266; ilwk-home.com)

 

Technology permeates almost every aspect of our lives, and the kitchen is no exception. The hub of the home now houses an increasing number of automated and smart innovations. Recent research by B&Q shows that up to 40 per cent of us would be willing to pay between £5,000 and £10,000 more for a home with a hi-tech kitchen. The trend for these advances, however, isn’t about simply adding gratuitous gadgets and gizmos, it’s geared towards helping our kitchens to run seamlessly and efficiently.

‘Designing and creating a room that looks amazing and also does its job as a working cooking space is essential,’ says Daniele Brutto, co-founder of Hub Kitchens (020 7924 2285; hubkitchens.com). ‘This blend of form and function can be achieved with the latest built-in systems and smart appliances.’

 

Cabinets and worktops

Electronically controlled cabinetry that opens and closes using motion sensors has been on offer for a few years, but has yet to become widely popular. Where technology is making a difference, however, is by adding functionality to units with tablet holders, built-in charging stations, touchscreens, USB outlets and functions such as Amazon Dash, which automatically orders new products when you run out.

‘Flip-down TV screens are no longer the go-to product,’ explains Dieter Berends, senior designer at Urban Interior (020 7739 4644; urbaninterior.co.uk). ‘Instead, technology has taken audio-visual design to a new level. There is now integrated, internet connected equipment that can stream information via Bluetooth or contain complete home-entertainment systems with multiple audio-visual options. They might have the ability to sync with a USB stick, connect to online radio or even with an older, analogue device.’

Worktops also come with extras, as the latest surfaces can be laid over electronics, such as an induction zone to make an invisible hob, or to create a wireless device-charging port. ‘Major mechanical moving parts within a kitchen will soon make their way into mainstream design,’ says Brutto. ‘A sliding table or breakfast bar that can be revealed at the touch of a button can now be incorporated into a kitchen to suit multifunctional needs. TM Italia, for example, already has a kitchen that is controlled via a desktop application, so the tap rises and falls on the click of a button and the sink lid opens and closes on demand.’