If you want to build your own home, you must understand how the planning application process works.

 Devon planning build, granddesignsmagazine.com

Consulting the local planning authority and nearby residents led to a successful application to build this home near Taunton, Devon

If you have a plot of land or a property that you want to knock down and replace, planning permission will be required before you can begin any work and you’ll have to submit a planning application. The system is discretionary – there is no fixed set of rules that determines whether consent will be granted or refused. But it can be useful to look at what has been built in the local area as a guide to what might be acceptable on your site.

‘As part of the Housing and Planning Act 2016, local authorities are required to help find land for those who have an interest in building their own homes’ says Jennifer Smith, director of Smith Jenkins (smithjenkins.co.uk). ‘It gives greater weight to the requirement to identify self-build plots in the local area. Councils are required to maintain a self-build register for those who wish to build their own homes. The details should be available on your local council’s website.’

It's all in the prep

Before a planning application is submitted some crucial work must take place. This involves assessing the site, local policies, the plot history and any constraints, and obtaining technical reports, if needed, before embarking on a design Your local council’s website is a good starting point for some of this prep work. Use it to research the history of the site and to find out whether there are any current or lapsed applications. It should also show local maps and policy documents, which will detail whether the site is in a settlement, green belt or conservation area. Some councils’ websites are better than others, and information such as tree-preservation orders may have to be sought in writing or via a telephone call.

Read more: Planning permission: how to improve your chances of success

Factors to consider

Designing a house isn’t just about how many rooms you want, you also need to think about the context of the plot, as a building that is sympathetic to the surrounding area is more likely to gain permission. Consider the street setting and whether the property will be visible from the road. It’s also important to make sure the house fits in with the scale of its neighbours. It’s easier to retain existing trees on a site than to plant new ones, and this should be a consideration in assessing the location of a new building on your plot.

When designing a house, you need to think about the context of the plot, as a building that is sympathetic to the area is more likely to gain permission. Consider the street setting and whether the property will be visible from the road. It’s also important to make sure the house fits in with the scale of its neighbours. It’s easier to retain existing trees on a site than to plant new ones, and this should be a consideration in assessing the location of a new building on your plot.

It is a good idea to arrange a meeting with the local planning office to discuss your ideas. They will let you know if there are any concerns about whether the project conforms to the legislation. It could save time in the long run, as you won’t end up wasting valuable hours working on what could eventually be deemed an inappropriate scheme. Another way to help things run smoothly is to liaise with neighbours. Local support could boost your application.

 Surrey

 Objections relating to the roof height of this self-build on a back garden plot in Surrey were resolved leading to planning consent

Check requirements

The planning process, from the point at which an application is submitted, is broadly similar wherever you live in the UK, with details first checked against national and local requirements to make sure they contain the necessary information. Simple errors, including not having a scale or north point on the plan, may invalidate an application.

Not preparing detailed reports such as ecology surveys cuts costs, but it could cause delays as such information is usually required, especially with rural or undeveloped sites. Councils should have a list of validation requirements on their websites. Use them to check what you need to submit when making your formal application.

Awaiting a decision

It should take eight weeks for the council to make a decision on a planning application after it has been validated.

In some instances, an application may be called before a planning committee, which will be held in public. A presentation will be made and any objections heard, before the members vote on whether or not to grant permission. If refused, an appeal can be made within a certain timeframe to the planning inspectorate.

MT1530235 

Built on greenbelt land in Essex, this project involved lengthy negotiations with the local authority. 

Skipping ahead

The application process can be daunting, so one of the most straightforward ways to self-build is to buy a site with planning consent already in place. If the approval is still current, permission should be achievable within the context of the original plans.

You won’t necessarily need to submit a new application if you want to make minor changes to an approved plan, but any large changes will require a new application. Should you be aiming to create a distinctive home, however, or if the application has lapsed, this may not be straightforward.

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