How to create a broken-plan kitchen scheme

Brokenplan kitchens take the benefits of openplan, but use dividing design tricks to create functional, comfortable spaces.

By Hugh Metcalf | 19 May 2020

Borrowing the best bits of openplan, but offering the chance to create comfortable, intimate spaces too, broken-plan living has a lot to offer a kitchen design.

kitchens by holloways island and peninsula - grand designs

Image: Kitchens by Holloways 

Where openplan design is focussed on undivided living spaces, brokenplan design borrows the sense of openness, but instates barriers, whether physical or not, to help to demarcate a space into its different functions.

The result? All the benefits of light, bright, spacious openplan living, but also the ability to create a sense of intimacy within separate spaces that openplan homes can sometimes lack.

Take a look at a few ways you can embrace brokenplan living in creating a kitchen for your build project.

Islands and peninsulas

If you’re unsure about how effective brokenplan can be, just think of a kitchen island or peninsula as a most basic example. These structural elements aren’t just about adding more cabinetry and surfaces to the kitchen, they often mark a dividing line between the cooking and living spaces.

Interior glazing

kitchen with crittall style interior doors - grand designs

Image: British Standard 

Having an openplan kitchen-cum-living space may be the modern way, but it comes with its own issues. The noise and smell of cooking can be a particular grievance in truly openplan spaces that may leave you wishing you’d installed a partition between these spaces.

If you’re concerned about this, one way to overcome is to opt for internal glazing – whether Crittall style doors or sleek near-frameless interior windows – which allows you to retain the eyelines throughout your home, while still having a physical divide between rooms.