Meet the architect behind the Isle of Wight ‘yoghurt house’

Grand Designs catches up with architect Lincoln Miles, who transformed a 70s bungalow on the Isle of Wight

By Andrea Manley | 20 June 2017

Architectural designer Lincoln Miles, who transformed a 70s bungalow on the Isle of Wight, has now created a series of innovative dwellings on the island.

What have you been up to since your house was first featured?

‘Since our grand design aired in 2010, things have been amazing. We’ve now sold our woodland retreat (below), which Kevin referred to as “the yoghurt house” [the corrugated cowshed sheets were painted with yoghurt to encourage the growth of moss and lichen], and my wife Lisa and I are about to embark on building a new home.’

TV House exclusive Transformed Seventies bungalow on the Isle of Wight 1

Photo: Rachael Smith

What attracted you to the location of your new property?

‘It’s on the site of an old radar bunker from the Second World War, nestled into the landscape on the southern tip of the Isle of Wight, with amazing views over to France. We can imagine the secrecy and danger, and the important role of the bunker in the war effort. A new building will be connected to the bunker, which is being left as is, and will become a gallery space for Lisa’s artwork and sculpture. In 200 years, the bunker, which was active in the Battle of Britain, will still be in place. My building may be forgotten but the bunker will remain timeless.’

Will you be including eco friendly features?

‘The aim of the house is to be semi-off-grid by designing to passive house standards using high levels of thermal insulation and airtight construction. It incorporates its own water supply together with photovoltaic and solar panels, which are mounted into the earth bank of the roof, providing hot water and electricity to the power-wall storage battery. Other renewables will be biomass and heat recovery.’